Investor News

Webinar: European Angel Fund in Ireland

By, Wednesday, 7th September 2016 | 0 comments
Filed under: Angel, 2016.

You can now watch back on this mornings webinar and hear guest speaker Drew O’Sullivan discuss the European Angel Fund (EAF) and how it will be adminstered in Ireland.

Slide deck from the presentation can be downloaded here

The EAF is an initiative advised by the EIF which provides equity to Business Angels and other non-institutional investors for the financing of innovative companies in the form of co-investments. The EAF works hand in hand with Business Angels and helps them to increase their investment capacity by co-investing into innovative companies in the seed, early or growth stage.

The activity of the EAF is adapted to the Business Angels' investment style by granting the highest degree of freedom in terms of decision making and management of investments. EAF Ireland is a dedicated €20M fund focused on co-investing with experienced business angel investors with a strong investment track record (realised and unrealised). EAF Ireland is funded by the European Investment Fund and Enterprise Ireland and in this informative session Drew O’Sullivan will give you all the information you need about the fund and how to apply.

The EAF Ireland fund enters into 10 year agreements with Business Angels planning to invest between €250K - 4M over that time period. The Business Angel undertakes their usual process in sourcing, selecting and investing in companies and the EAF Ireland funds on pari passu terms into the Irish startup/growth companies. Profits are shared 60:40 to the benefit of the Business Angel.

This session is part of a series of informative HBAN webinars we broadcast for our members. If you would like to find out more about the benefits of joining our network or have any questions please call Sarah on 01 669 8525 or email

Bookmark and Share

Required Fields are displayed as shown

HTML is disabled and your e–mail address won't be published. Comments will be deleted if commenters leave a keyword instead of a name in the name field, if sites linked in the URL field are commercial in nature and not related to the blog, or if the comment simply doesn't add substance to the discussion.